Item Records

This page shows all the information we have about this item. Both the institution that physically holds this item, and RRN members have contributed the knowledge on this page. You’re looking at the item record provided by the holding institution. If you scroll further down the page, you’ll see the information from RRN members, and can share your own knowledge too.

The RRN processes the information it receives from each institution to make it more readable and easier to search. If you’re doing in-depth research on this item, be sure to take a look at the Data Source tab to see the information exactly as it was provided by the institution.

These records are easy to share because each has a unique web address. You can copy and paste the location from your browser’s address bar into an email, word document, or chat message to share this item with others.

  • Data
  • Data Source

This information was automatically generated from data provided by MOA: University of British Columbia. It has been standardized to aid in finding and grouping information within the RRN. Accuracy and meaning should be verified from the Data Source tab.

Description

Large wood crouching bear, adzed to emphasize the sculptural form, carved from solid block of wood. The hind legs and paws are bent; the front legs are slightly bent while the front paws lie flat. The snout and ears are large and protruding; the eyes, ears, mouth and bared teeth are carved. The tongue is hanging out. Facial areas painted red and black.

Iconographic Meaning

Bears were an important crest of Raven lineages.

Narrative

Dr. Walter Koerner commissioned Reid to make this sculpture for his personal collection. It was originally commissioned for his backyard garden, but Koerner decided it looked too large for the space so he donated it to UBC. It was installed on the UBC campus in 1963, in the woods near International House. A bronze plaque made for that location reads: Haida Bear by Bill Reid Presented to UBC by Walter C. Koerner 1963. At some point, after the new Museum building was built, the bear was transferred to MOA and moved indoors.

Item History

With an account, you can ask other users a question about this item. Request an Account

With an account, you can submit information about this item and have it visible to all users and institutions on the RRN. Request an Account

Similar Items