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This information was automatically generated from data provided by MOA: University of British Columbia. It has been standardized to aid in finding and grouping information within the RRN. Accuracy and meaning should be verified from the Data Source tab.

Description

Silkscreened prints on burlap cloth. Two black and red silkscreened animal images, printed on a vertically rectangular piece of burlap. Otter-like figure in lower half; bird in upper half. Long, black lines above, below, and in between the two images.

History Of Use

Northwest coast serigraphs are a contemporary art form, deriving from early 20th century drawings of traditional crest and decorative designs, commissioned by anthropologists and undertaken by artists such as Charles Edenshaw. Residential schools reinforced the medium, while discouraging the use of traditional themes. An important series of traditional designs in coloured pencil and watercolour were done by Mungo Martin for UBC in 1949-50. The 1960s saw the rapid growth of prints, first in unlimited poster editions, and later with the establishment of the Gitanmaax School of Northwest Coast Indian Art at 'Ksan (1967), and of the Northwest Coast Indian Artist Guild (1977), limited edition art runs became the standard. Northwest coast silkscreen prints are part of the mainstream art market, as well as, functioning within the Native context as potlatch gifts, and commemorative prints. Although there are distinctive regional styles, individual artists may work in several styles, or apply unique themes and variations to specific works.

Item History

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