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Linked Chain16/673 B
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Material
wood
Made in
USA ? or Canada ?
Holding Institution
American Museum of Natural History
View Item Record
Stick, Modern16/673 A
Blank

Material
wood and glass
Made in
USA ? or Canada ?
Holding Institution
American Museum of Natural History
View Item Record
Horn SpoonE360327-1
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From card: "Handle carved with totemic representations of raven and other figures. One [E360327-1] has old number 274,196. It is from the Harriman collection." Note: Harriman Accession was collected by John Green Brady, 1878 - 1909.

Culture
Haida
Made in
Alaska, USA
Holding Institution
National Museum of Natural History
View Item Record
Commemorative Native American Code Talkers MedalE435526-0
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Commerative Native American Code Talkers Medal, minted by the US mint and given to the families of code talkers. On the obverse is a kneedling soldier with the words "Tlingit Warriors Code Talkers" and on the reverse an image of a killer whale with the words "Kille Whale Clan" "World War II" and "Act of Congress 2008".This medal was the only commemorative coin minted to honor the Tlingit code talkers. It displays a hat that was repatriated to the Dakl'aweidi clan by the NMNH (the hat was formerly NMNH catalog number E230063). The hat and related replicas and images of it have become a symbol of the relationship of the clan with the Smithsonian, as well as a symbol of the clan itself. Although the clan has other killer whale hats of other forms, this form was chosen to represent them on this important medal. Historically, the medal honors the Tlingit code talkers, including Mark Jacobs Jr., and their service to the United States in WWII.

Culture
Tlingit
Made in
Juneau, Alaska, USA
Holding Institution
National Museum of Natural History
View Item Record
Papier-mache killer whale hatE435525-0
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Papier mache hat made in the form of the Killer Whale hat repatriated to the Dakl'aweidi clan in 2005 (catalog number E230063). The hat is molded on an inverted Easter basket to fit on the head and has four black, leather ties. The whale has a red mouth, red nostrils, a face in the back, and decorations along the sides. There is a long dorsal fin with another face on either side and long, black hair inserted through holes in the back edge of the dorsal fin. The eyes are made of abalone, and there are smaller abalone circles along the side, at the edge of the dorsal fin and along the mouth as teeth. One of the holes is missing hair. One of the abalone shells along the proper left side is missing. "Armondo" is written on the inside of the hat. Notes from Eric Hollinger's 8/22/2016 Interview with DeAsis Family about the three papier-mâché killer whale hats: The family indicated they were interested in donating the hats to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, so Eric Hollinger met with them at their home in Juneau, Alaska, to learn about the history of the hats and pick them up. Eric met with Leroy Deasis, Armando, DeAsis, Antonio DeAsis, Joshua DeAsis and Harold Jacobs, and Joshua asked questions of Lorraine DeAsis by text during the visit.The family was asked what they recalled as their reasons for making the hats, how they were made and how they were used. Reasons for Making the Hats: The family was living in Seattle at the time the hats were made in 2006. At the time, Armando was 9 years old, Antonio was 8 years old and Joshua was 5 years old. The boys first danced with the hats as part of dance group in Seattle before dancing with them in Tlingit Celebration in Juneau in 2006. Armando remembered being shown how to dance with the hats when his Mom, Lorraine, showed the boys how to dance with them by dancing in a circle in their kitchen. Leroy noted that Tlingit culture is based on doing things properly and not offending your opposites. Leroy said the hats were made to continue to involve the boys in the culture. He said, it was “important to let the kids know where they were from since they were away from Alaska.” He noted that, in Seattle, they needed more regalia. Armando noted that they wanted something that could be damaged and was intended to be able to be put at risk. Lorraine says they made the hats in 2006. She asked Uncle Danny what designs could be used but did not ask permission to make the hats. He suggested the Killer Whale hat form and they settled on the image of the Killer Whale hat illustrated in the water color in Swanton’s 1908 publication. According to texts from Lorraine to Joshua, “It was so you guys could learn as much as you could about the culture. Same reason we joined Tiny’s dance group. We never imagined you would ever see the real hat or Chilkat blankets.” She went on to note, “the boys would dance with the hats to enter for the Killer Whale songs. Made the hats and some paddles to dance with Tiny’s group.” Lorraine wrote, “it was very difficult to teach kids the culture when we lived in Seattle.” According to the boys, they performed in 50 or more dances per year, almost every weekend with the dance group in Seattle. “It’s like training wheels for dancing real at.oow.” Joshua said. They were being trained for dancing and caring for the hats without realizing what they were being prepared for. It was only after dancing the 3D replica of the Killer Whale hat made by the Smithsonian that he realized the significance of the killer whale hats and the history behind them. Until then, to Joshua, the dance performances, including Celebration, were just another “gig.” Josh remembered dancing in Celebration and people taking photos of them and then seeing their photos in the paper Juneau Empire in 2006. According to Lorraine, Beth Garcia took the photo of the boys in the hats at Celebration. The original hat upon which the DeAsis family replicas were made [catalog number E230063] was repatriated to the clan in 2005. It was displayed briefly at the Clan Conference in 2006 and was transferred to the new caretaker of the clan’s at.oow in 2007 at the koo.eex for Mark Jacobs, Jr. At that memorial, Armando DeAsis danced the original hat for the first time in more than 100 years at a potlatch. After that time, the DeAsis brothers have been regularly called upon to dance the original hat in many different contexts. Joshua noted that he never thought of the significance of dancing the original until he danced in the replica hat made by the Smithsonian at the Clan Conference in 2012. He did not see the original as different from other regalia until he danced with the replica. Dancing the replica made Joshua realize the importance of the original. It struck him that the Smithsonian was interested in using 3D technology to remake a hat that was part of his own history. They had already made their own 3D replicas of the original years earlier. Joshua thought making the papier-mâché hats was the same as making vests and blankets and other regalia. He assumed everybody made their own hats. Until Joshua saw the 3D replica made by the Smithsonian he did not recognize their paper hats as replicas. Armando recalled how learning with the paper hats was so much lighter. He remembered the first time he danced with a wooden hat and how much heavier they were. Making the Hats: Lorraine did most of the work making the hats but all three boys helped work on them. Each boy worked on their own hat. Joshua remembers Lorraine helped him paint his hat. They recalled the hats were made in steps. Styrofoam was cut in the shape of the head first. Leroy DeAsis was a carpenter and had the tools that allowed the cutting of the foam. Armando remembers testing out different things to fit on their heads for the interior of the hats. He recalled they tried a bowl and a baseball cap but neither of them worked. They then settled on the use of baskets for the interior of the hats. Armando remembered going to store with his mother and trying out different size baskets to see what fitted. Leroy noted that they made them shortly after Easter and they used the kids’ Easter baskets at the interior frame of the hats. Joshua’s hat has a foam spacer inside the basket because his head was too small for his basket. The name of each boy is written on the basket inside each hat.

Culture
Tlingit
Made in
Seattle, Washington, USA
Holding Institution
National Museum of Natural History
View Item Record
Basketry Tray, TwinedE360503-0
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Attributed as probably Northwest Coast, rather than California, by Linda Eisenhart.

Culture
Indian ? or Northwest Coast Indian ?
Made in
“United States (not certain) / Canada (not certain): California (not certain)” ?
Holding Institution
National Museum of Natural History
View Item Record
Papier-mache killer whale hatE435523-0
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Papier mache hat made in the form of the Killer Whale hat repatriated to the Dalk'weidi clan in 2005 (catalog number E230063). The hat is molded on an inverted Easter basket to fit on the head and has four black, leather ties. The whale has a red mouth, red nostrils, a face in the back, and decorations along the sides. There is a long dorsal fin with another face on either side and long, black hair inserted through holes in the back edge of the dorsal fin. The eyes are made of abalone, and there are smaller abalone circles along the side, at the edge of the dorsal fin and along the mouth as teeth. One of the holes is missing hair. "Joshua" is written on the inside of the hat. Notes from Eric Hollinger's 8/22/2016 Interview with DeAsis Family about the three papier-mâché killer whale hats: The family indicated they were interested in donating the hats to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, so Eric Hollinger met with them at their home in Juneau, Alaska, to learn about the history of the hats and pick them up. Eric met with Leroy Deasis, Armando, DeAsis, Antonio DeAsis, Joshua DeAsis and Harold Jacobs, and Joshua asked questions of Lorraine DeAsis by text during the visit.The family was asked what they recalled as their reasons for making the hats, how they were made and how they were used. Reasons for Making the Hats: The family was living in Seattle at the time the hats were made in 2006. At the time, Armando was 9 years old, Antonio was 8 years old and Joshua was 5 years old. The boys first danced with the hats as part of dance group in Seattle before dancing with them in Tlingit Celebration in Juneau in 2006. Armando remembered being shown how to dance with the hats when his Mom, Lorraine, showed the boys how to dance with them by dancing in a circle in their kitchen. Leroy noted that Tlingit culture is based on doing things properly and not offending your opposites. Leroy said the hats were made to continue to involve the boys in the culture. He said, it was “important to let the kids know where they were from since they were away from Alaska.” He noted that, in Seattle, they needed more regalia. Armando noted that they wanted something that could be damaged and was intended to be able to be put at risk. Lorraine says they made the hats in 2006. She asked Uncle Danny what designs could be used but did not ask permission to make the hats. He suggested the Killer Whale hat form and they settled on the image of the Killer Whale hat illustrated in the water color in Swanton’s 1908 publication. According to texts from Lorraine to Joshua, “It was so you guys could learn as much as you could about the culture. Same reason we joined Tiny’s dance group. We never imagined you would ever see the real hat or Chilkat blankets.” She went on to note, “the boys would dance with the hats to enter for the Killer Whale songs. Made the hats and some paddles to dance with Tiny’s group.” Lorraine wrote, “it was very difficult to teach kids the culture when we lived in Seattle.” According to the boys, they performed in 50 or more dances per year, almost every weekend with the dance group in Seattle. “It’s like training wheels for dancing real at.oow.” Joshua said. They were being trained for dancing and caring for the hats without realizing what they were being prepared for. It was only after dancing the 3D replica of the Killer Whale hat made by the Smithsonian that he realized the significance of the killer whale hats and the history behind them. Until then, to Joshua, the dance performances, including Celebration, were just another “gig.” Josh remembered dancing in Celebration and people taking photos of them and then seeing their photos in the paper Juneau Empire in 2006. According to Lorraine, Beth Garcia took the photo of the boys in the hats at Celebration. The original hat upon which the DeAsis family replicas were made [catalog number E230063] was repatriated to the clan in 2005. It was displayed briefly at the Clan Conference in 2006 and was transferred to the new caretaker of the clan’s at.oow in 2007 at the koo.eex for Mark Jacobs, Jr. At that memorial, Armando DeAsis danced the original hat for the first time in more than 100 years at a potlatch. After that time, the DeAsis brothers have been regularly called upon to dance the original hat in many different contexts. Joshua noted that he never thought of the significance of dancing the original until he danced in the replica hat made by the Smithsonian at the Clan Conference in 2012. He did not see the original as different from other regalia until he danced with the replica. Dancing the replica made Joshua realize the importance of the original. It struck him that the Smithsonian was interested in using 3D technology to remake a hat that was part of his own history. They had already made their own 3D replicas of the original years earlier. Joshua thought making the papier-mâché hats was the same as making vests and blankets and other regalia. He assumed everybody made their own hats. Until Joshua saw the 3D replica made by the Smithsonian he did not recognize their paper hats as replicas. Armando recalled how learning with the paper hats was so much lighter. He remembered the first time he danced with a wooden hat and how much heavier they were. Making the Hats: Lorraine did most of the work making the hats but all three boys helped work on them. Each boy worked on their own hat. Joshua remembers Lorraine helped him paint his hat. They recalled the hats were made in steps. Styrofoam was cut in the shape of the head first. Leroy DeAsis was a carpenter and had the tools that allowed the cutting of the foam. Armando remembers testing out different things to fit on their heads for the interior of the hats. He recalled they tried a bowl and a baseball cap but neither of them worked.

Culture
Tlingit
Made in
Seattle, Washington, USA
Holding Institution
National Museum of Natural History
View Item Record
Paper Placemats from Code Talkers memorial potlatchE435527-0
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Three printed paper placemats. Blue background, with a photo of Mark Jacobs, Jr., killer whale clan symbols, and the words "Dakl'aweidi Memorial - September 1 & 2, 2007 - Sitka, Alaska"This place mat is representative of the kinds of items provided at place settings for Tlingit memorial potlatches. This one as used at the potlatch of Mark Jacobs in 2007. It shows a photo of Jacobs wearing the NMNH Killer Whale Dakl'aweidi clan hat (formerly NMNH catalog number E230063) on January 2, 2005, when it was repatriated to him in a Sitka hospital. The two killer whale images on either side of his photo are the killer whales on Mark's clan house in Angoon; commonly called the "Killer Whales facing away house". This item shows how imagery at memorial potlatches honor the individual memorialized as well as their clan crest connections through their crest symbols."

Culture
Tlingit
Made in
Sitka, Baranof Island, Alaska, USA
Holding Institution
National Museum of Natural History
View Item Record
Papier-mache killer whale hatE435524-0
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Papier mache hat made in the form of the Killer Whale hat repatriated to the Dakl'aweidi clan in 2005 (catalog number E2300630). The hat is molded on an inverted Easter basket to fit on the head and has four black, leather ties. The whale has a red mouth, red nostrils, a face in the back, and decorations along the sides. There is a long dorsal fin with another face on either side and long, black hair inserted through holes in the back edge of the dorsal fin. The eyes are made of abalone, and there are smaller abalone circles along the side, at the edge of the dorsal fin and along the mouth as teeth. One of the holes is missing hair and one of the abalone circles along the edge of the dorsal fin is missing. "Tony" is written on the inside of the hat. Notes from Eric Hollinger's 8/22/2016 Interview with DeAsis Family about the three papier-mâché killer whale hats: The family indicated they were interested in donating the hats to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, so Eric Hollinger met with them at their home in Juneau, Alaska, to learn about the history of the hats and pick them up. Eric met with Leroy Deasis, Armando, DeAsis, Antonio DeAsis, Joshua DeAsis and Harold Jacobs, and Joshua asked questions of Lorraine DeAsis by text during the visit.The family was asked what they recalled as their reasons for making the hats, how they were made and how they were used. Reasons for Making the Hats: The family was living in Seattle at the time the hats were made in 2006. At the time, Armando was 9 years old, Antonio was 8 years old and Joshua was 5 years old. The boys first danced with the hats as part of dance group in Seattle before dancing with them in Tlingit Celebration in Juneau in 2006. Armando remembered being shown how to dance with the hats when his Mom, Lorraine, showed the boys how to dance with them by dancing in a circle in their kitchen. Leroy noted that Tlingit culture is based on doing things properly and not offending your opposites. Leroy said the hats were made to continue to involve the boys in the culture. He said, it was “important to let the kids know where they were from since they were away from Alaska.” He noted that, in Seattle, they needed more regalia. Armando noted that they wanted something that could be damaged and was intended to be able to be put at risk. Lorraine says they made the hats in 2006. She asked Uncle Danny what designs could be used but did not ask permission to make the hats. He suggested the Killer Whale hat form and they settled on the image of the Killer Whale hat illustrated in the water color in Swanton’s 1908 publication. According to texts from Lorraine to Joshua, “It was so you guys could learn as much as you could about the culture. Same reason we joined Tiny’s dance group. We never imagined you would ever see the real hat or Chilkat blankets.” She went on to note, “the boys would dance with the hats to enter for the Killer Whale songs. Made the hats and some paddles to dance with Tiny’s group.” Lorraine wrote, “it was very difficult to teach kids the culture when we lived in Seattle.” According to the boys, they performed in 50 or more dances per year, almost every weekend with the dance group in Seattle. “It’s like training wheels for dancing real at.oow.” Joshua said. They were being trained for dancing and caring for the hats without realizing what they were being prepared for. It was only after dancing the 3D replica of the Killer Whale hat made by the Smithsonian that he realized the significance of the killer whale hats and the history behind them. Until then, to Joshua, the dance performances, including Celebration, were just another “gig.” Josh remembered dancing in Celebration and people taking photos of them and then seeing their photos in the paper Juneau Empire in 2006. According to Lorraine, Beth Garcia took the photo of the boys in the hats at Celebration. The original hat upon which the DeAsis family replicas were made [catalog number E230063] was repatriated to the clan in 2005. It was displayed briefly at the Clan Conference in 2006 and was transferred to the new caretaker of the clan’s at.oow in 2007 at the koo.eex for Mark Jacobs, Jr. At that memorial, Armando DeAsis danced the original hat for the first time in more than 100 years at a potlatch. After that time, the DeAsis brothers have been regularly called upon to dance the original hat in many different contexts. Joshua noted that he never thought of the significance of dancing the original until he danced in the replica hat made by the Smithsonian at the Clan Conference in 2012. He did not see the original as different from other regalia until he danced with the replica. Dancing the replica made Joshua realize the importance of the original. It struck him that the Smithsonian was interested in using 3D technology to remake a hat that was part of his own history. They had already made their own 3D replicas of the original years earlier. Joshua thought making the papier-mâché hats was the same as making vests and blankets and other regalia. He assumed everybody made their own hats. Until Joshua saw the 3D replica made by the Smithsonian he did not recognize their paper hats as replicas. Armando recalled how learning with the paper hats was so much lighter. He remembered the first time he danced with a wooden hat and how much heavier they were. Making the Hats: Lorraine did most of the work making the hats but all three boys helped work on them. Each boy worked on their own hat. Joshua remembers Lorraine helped him paint his hat. They recalled the hats were made in steps. Styrofoam was cut in the shape of the head first. Leroy DeAsis was a carpenter and had the tools that allowed the cutting of the foam. Armando remembers testing out different things to fit on their heads for the interior of the hats. He recalled they tried a bowl and a baseball cap but neither of them worked. They then settled on the use of baskets for the interior of the hats. Armando remembered going to store with his mother and trying out different size baskets to see what fitted. Leroy noted that they made them shortly after Easter and they used the kids’ Easter baskets at the interior frame of the hats. Joshua’s hat has a foam spacer inside the basket because his head was too small for his basket. The name of each boy is written on the basket inside each hat.

Culture
Tlingit
Made in
Seattle, Washington, USA
Holding Institution
National Museum of Natural History
View Item Record